May 2011
Blog

May 2011 posts

Food matters

Cooking with kids is a great way to expose them to new flavors and cultures.  It teaches them math and science in a way that they don’t even realize.  It brings families closer and having family dinners has shown to reduce depression and drug use, and make for happier, healthier kids.

There is a wonderful not-so-new concept that is catching on like the latest cute cat video on YouTube. This experience is bringing communities together and helping families bond.

Community Kitchens.  

Once a week, multi-generational families from a community come together and cook with local foods from their Farmer’s Market to make wonderfully nutritious meals.  There are conversations over chopping carrots about the community, families, and cooking.  Then everyone sits down and has a fantastic meal together and have lively discussions about anything.  At then end, everyone cleans up, and takes home leftovers to freeze for easier and healthier meals during the week.

Parents just don’t have much time in the evening to prepare such time intensive dishes, after work and between homework, laundry, dishes, and bedtime.  Home Economics and Cooking classes have been cut from most school districts’ budgets, so where do our kids learn to prepare barley, or homemade apple pie?

Swedish to Host Annual Lights of Remembrance Event May 21 to Honor People Who Have Died

SEATTLE, May 19, 2011 -- Swedish's Spritual Care department is hosting its annual Lights of Remembrance event on Saturday, May 21 from 10-11 a.m. in Glaser Auditorium on the First Hill campus (747 Broadway, first floor).

It is an opportunity for family, loved ones and caregivers from the community to take time to come together for a morning of reflection. The service is secular and includes readings, reflections, music and the lighting of candles in memory of those who have died.

Attendees are encouraged to bring a momento of their loved one(s) for display during the service.

For more information, call 206-386-2082.

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The Spring Issue of BrainWaves Is Now Available

The Spring 2011 edition of BrainWaves is now available online.

BrainWaves is the newsletter of the Swedish Neuroscience Institute. Published quarterly, BrainWaves provides information about neurological conditions treated at the Institute, and also profiles the programs, services, and new initiatives of the institute and its staff.

Also check out our past editions of the BrainWaves newsletter.

Issue 4 - SEIU Continues to Present Proposals

Proposals on economics, low census fund and EVS staffing

Swedish and SEIU 1199NW continued contract negotiations on Tuesday, May 17. SEIU 1199NW presented their economic proposal as well as several new articles and changes to existing language. A number of the recommendations were aimed at creating more similarities among the three contracts.

The Union walked through their proposal and provided testimonials to address a variety of issues affecting RNs, technical staff and service workers including:

5 things to know about Swedish Issaquah

Despite the winter-like weather, spring is quickly flying by. In honor of it being the fifth month of the year, here are five facts to note about the new Swedish/Issaquah campus located in the Issaquah Highlands.

1: The medical center opens in two phases.


Phase 1 opens in just under two months – on July 14
. This phase includes the opening of the medical office building and outpatient services, including: primary care, emergency room, imaging center, breast-care center, outpatient surgery, cancer center, physical therapy, outpatient lab, testing and treatment center, and specialty-care such as:

 

 

  • Physical and Occupational Therapy
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Colon and Rectal
  • Urology
  • Allergy
  • Pediatric Specialty Care
  • Gastroenterology
  • Neurology and Neurosurgery
  • Audiology
  • General Surgery
  • Pulmonology
  • Pain Management
  • Plastic Surgery
  • Cardiology
  • Orthopedics
  • Otolaryngology (ENT)
  • Spine Care
  • Vascular Surgery
  • Ophthalmology
  • Weight-Loss Services
  • Vasectomy
  • Diabetes Education

 

 

Phase 2 opens Nov. 1, 2011. As you may have heard, we are several months ahead of schedule and will open the inpatient hospital services earlier than planned. The following services are coming in November:

  • Inpatient Surgery
  • Labor & Delivery and Postpartum Units
  • Pediatric Inpatient Unit
  • Medical/Surgical Inpatient Unit
  • Intensive Care Unit

2: Get a sneak peak of the new campus on Saturday, July 9.

Save Saturday, July 9 for a day to celebrate with Swedish. From 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Swedish will be hosting a celebration that promises fun for the whole family. Along with tours, health-education classes, and giveaways, the annual Highlands Day festival will be taking place right next door. More to come!

3: Shop at the New Swedish/Issaquah

In addition to providing an array of medical services, Swedish is enhancing the patient experience by incorporating new retail shops into the facility. Located in the heart of the new Swedish/Issaquah campus, the Shops at Swedish brings together health and wellness products, unique gifts and personalized services. Here’s a look at the shops opening July 14:

Expecting the Best in Pregnancy and Multiple Sclerosis

Considering that multiple sclerosis (MS) affects primarily women of childbearing age, it comes as no surprise that for many patients MS and pregnancy often occur together. The issues to consider when discussing pregnancy and MS include:

  • How pregnancy affects MS
  • How MS affects pregnancy
  • How MS treatment should be managed throughout pregnancy

The Pregnancy in MS (PRIMS) study of 254 patients revealed that pregnancy is generally protective against MS relapses, in particular during the third trimester. In contrast, the same study found a rebound of relapses during three months post delivery, with 30 percent of women experiencing a relapse within three months after delivery. Several strategies have been proposed to avert the risk of postpartum relapse, including the use of prophylactic IVIG or corticosteroids. More recently, exclusive breast-feeding has been found to offer some protection against postpartum MS activity; however, this finding was disputed in a subsequent study.

There is no evidence ...

How to feel good in your skin

Despite skin being the largest human organ, many people don’t take the necessary steps to properly take care of it.

As the body ages, the skin’s elastin and collagen break down, making it more difficult for old skin cells to be replaced with new ones. The body’s oil production also slows as the years go by. These combined effects cause skin to appear duller, dryer and more wrinkled.

While around 50 percent of our skin condition depends on genetics, the other 50 percent relies on how well we treat our skin. Follow these tips to practice basic skin care in your younger years:

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