May 2011
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May 2011 posts

Breast Augmentation Surgery

Breast Augmentation

Breast augmentation surgery is a safe and reliable way to enhance breast shape and size. Breast enhancement using breast implants can give a woman more proportional shape and may improve self esteem.

Breast augmentation surgery is an operation designed to improve the shape and volume of the breast. The operation addresses common breast aesthetic issues, such as lack of breast volume, flattened breast shape and drooping nipple position. The operation can be combined with breast lift (mastopexy) procedures to further enhance the breast form.

To learn more about Breast Augmentation Surgery, including before and after photos, visit www.scottsattlermd.com

 

Breast Reduction

What is Breast Reduction Surgery?

A breast reduction (reduction mammoplasty) is a surgical procedure that reduces breast weight to improve both biomechanical function and aesthetics. After breast reduction surgery, the breast is ‘lighter’ and has a better shape. Many women with heavy and pendulous breasts suffer from neck pain, back pain and head aches for many decades of life. Self-consciousness in social settings and the inability to find properly fitting clothing are also frequent concerns. A breast reduction can significantly improve these functional and aesthetic issues.

Patient satisfaction with breast reduction surgery is extremely high. When the American Society of Plastic Surgeons surveyed a large group of women after breast reduction surgery recently, over 95% of patients responded that they would have the surgery done again. Breast reduction surgery consistently ranks at the top of patient satisfaction surveys for all procedures performed by plastic surgeons.

How is Breast Reduction Surgery Done?

Depending on ...

Start easy and hold long.

 We were meant to be hunters and gatherers, now we wear scrubs and suits. However, as we have adapted to our new environment, we can do little things to keep our bodies satisfied; hydrate, eat whole foods, move and stretch. Take one step today, give yourself s few moments of zen by stretching.

My hearing loss isn't bad enough for hearing aids, is it?

After a hearing test, it is common to have questions about the results.  One that is frequently asked is “My hearing loss isn’t bad enough for hearing aids, is it?” In fact one young man asked me that very question today that made me want to share my answer here. This is a great question!  Read on for my answer.

Emerging therapies in multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is unique among neurological diseases in that there are currently eight treatments for this one condition that have received approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Five of these drugs require subcutaneous or intramuscular injection, two are administered intravenously, and fingolimod, the newest agent on the block, is given orally. None are considered curative, but these disease-modifying therapies (DMT) have led to a reduction in relapse rates and the progression of disability.

Despite this progress, each of the drugs comes with side effects, including flu-like symptoms with the interferons, lipoatrophy with glatiramer, progressive multifocal leukodystrophy (PML) with natalizumab, and congestive heart failure or leukemia with mitoxantrone. As the first oral agent for MS, fingolimod created great expectations prior to FDA approval. Its popularity, however, has been surprisingly limited, presumably due to the potential for unknown long-term risks. The occur rence of PML with natalizumab demonstrated to MS neurologists and patients the potential risks associated with new drugs.

Additional DMTs in the pipeline may increase MS-management effectiveness in coming years, although safety will continue to be a major consideration in the use of these drugs. For instance, oral cladribine was on the verge of FDA approval in early March when the agency referred the drug back for more safety studies. This drug is already used in intravenous form for the management of hairy cell leukemia, but it is being studied for use with remitting relapsing MS because of its apoptotic effects on lymphocytes. If cladribine is ultimately approved for use, the risk of infection and neoplasms may limit its use.

Other oral agents being studied include:

Head Injuries in Kids: when do they need to get checked out?

We all know toddlers have big heads. It’s no secret. I always used to get a good laugh from my kids as they were just learning to walk. As they leaned over, once the head started to fall, the body was sure to follow. Since I was a medical student and resident when my kids were that age, watching them weeble and wobble around the room provided hours of inexpensive entertainment in between studying for my board exams. But unfortunately, sometimes those falls result in more significant head injuries, with skull fractures, bleeding in the brain, and concussions.

The challenge for us as parents is determining when our children have sustained a “significant” head injury that we need to take them to see the doctor or when we can just observe them at home. For this reason parents often rush their kids to the ER after even a seemingly minor bump to the head.

In honor of our patients

Our bereavement team sent this picture to share in honor of our patients on Memorial Day:

"Each Memorial Day we pause and reflect on the numbers of people who have touched our lives and honor the patients who have been in our care. This year we made a paper quilt (paper represents impermanence) with one heart image to honor each patient who passed away in the last year."

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