March 2014
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March 2014 posts

New Washington State Law to Help Children with Food Allergies

It is with great happiness that I update an earlier blog posted several months ago with the news that patients with food allergies now have a law that helps them afford their treatment.  On Friday March 28th, Governor Jay Inslee signed a law that makes Washington the most recent state in the country to set a mandate for medical coverage of elemental formulas in the treatment of Eosinophilic GI disorders (EGIDs).  EGIDs are a severe form of gastrointestinal inflammation that results from food allergy. 


Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) braces improve gait

Up to 80 percent of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) have problems with walking.  The combination of weakness of the muscles of the legs, spasticity, and core weakness contributes to this.  Often, it will present with problems lifting the foot, referred to as foot drop.  This is due to weakness of the muscles that lift the foot (dorsiflexors) and spasticity or over power of the muscles that push the foot down (plantar flexors).  Traditional ankle foot orthosis have advantages over functional electrical stimulation (FES) braces in that they help with ankle stability and reduce spasticity.  Advantages of FES braces include some evidence that there may be stimulation of the cortical neurons above the stimulation area, they are less cumbersome, and more discrete to wear.

A recent study looked at ..

Atlas of Ultrasound Guided Musculoskeletal Injections

The most comprehensive atlas of ultrasound guided musculoskeletal injections is now available!  I contributed a chapter to the hip section.   This book is considerably more comprehensive than another book just published with the same name and has contributions from many all-star sports medicine physicians. Click here to check it out.

Seattle Times Guest Column: Why it’s worth signing up for insurance coverage by March 31

This week Tom Gibbon, Swedish Community Specialty Clinic Manager and co-chair the Cover King County Leadership Circle, co-authored a guest column in the Seattle Times encouraging readers to sign up for health insurance coverage before the March 31 deadline.


Read the Seattle Times column.

An innovative solution for the un (and under) insured

Health-care reform is a big, confusing, emotionally-charged topic. Now that 2014 is underway and the Affordable Care Act is beginning to take effect, many more Americans will have greater access to health insurance than they had before. It is estimated that 180,000 people in King County alone will become newly insured this year.

Still, there will be many people in our community – and throughout the country – who will continue to face barriers to accessing care. Some of them will be considered underinsured because they can’t afford to fill the gap in medical expenses not covered by their insurance. Others receiving Medicaid may find it difficult to locate a physician who is willing to take them on as a patient, as doctors are not required to see Medicaid patients, and many don’t. And then, there will probably always be those people who don’t have any insurance at all because, for one reason or another, they can’t sign up: the homeless, the chronically mentally ill, those who can’t read or write English, to name just a few.

Community clinics scattered throughout the nation, including several in our community, help address this problem on the primary care end. But access to specialty medical care for low-income patients facing barriers to care like the ones described above is likely to remain extremely difficult.

Fortunately, an innovative program pioneered at Swedish is addressing this effectively, and is likely to become a national model.

The Swedish Community Specialty Clinic (SCSC) was expanded and moved to the Swedish/First Hill campus in  ..

Join the Swedish MS Center for Walk MS

The Swedish MS Center is proud to participate in the annual Multiple Sclerosis Walk organized by the National MS Society. The annual MS Walk raises awareness of multiple sclerosis in our community and also raises funds for new cutting-edge research and life changing programs and services of the National MS Society Greater Northwest Chapter. The NMSS Greater NW Chapter serves more than 15,000 people with MS living in Alaska, Montana and Central and Western Washington.
 
The Swedish MS Center has formed a Walk MS team to join in the fundraising efforts. Anyone is welcome to join the team-patients, friends, family or concerned community members. By joining, you can make a powerful statement and real difference for people living with multiple sclerosis. The money raised by the team will give hope to thousands of people living with MS in the Northwest. Join or donate to the team now!
 

FDA declines approval of Lemtrada for the treatment of MS

On December 30, 2013, the US Food and Drug Administration declined to approve the use of alemtuzumab (Lemtrada) for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. The FDA stated that the manufacturer of Lemtrada “has not submitted evidence from adequate and well-controlled studies that demonstrate the benefits of Lemtrada outweigh its serious adverse effects.” This was a surprising decision to some, as only a month earlier an advisory panel of experts convened by the FDA, while raising some objections, voted to have this medicine approved. The manufacturer of Lemtrada, Genzyme, a Sanofi company, intends to appeal this decision.
 
In response, a number of MS organizations and experts have voiced their concerns that with this step, MS patients are left without a potential choice in therapy. This decision is particularly difficult for ...
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