June 2011
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June 2011 posts

An Appetite for Summer (Summer produce worth getting excited about)

IT'S HERE! The most exciting event of the year (no, I am not talking about the Nordstrom Anniversary sale), it’s the start of summer! While the weather takes its time to transition, I am pleased to present to you an alternative reason to keep wearing your eager smile: summer produce! This is perhaps one of the most generous seasons, offering a rainbow of fruits and vegetables exploding with honeyed and tart flavors.

(Are you hungry yet?)

Summer Produce

This is a rough prediction of when you can expect to see the following produce in season:

You may have noticed that cherries, currants, raspberries, and strawberries are already brightening up grocery bins. Next month (brace yourself) apples, apricots, blueberries, blackberries, boysenberries, figs, huckle/goose/logan/marionberries, nectarines, peaches, pears, and plums will be all be begging to be placed in your grocery bag. Broccoli, cauliflower, cucumber, lettuce, onion, peas, tomato and zucchini will be irresistibly fresh beginning in July that even the “veggie-hater” surrenders. Corn, peppers and melons can be welcomed around the same time as the hydroplanes (August). Herbs also thrive this season, starting in June and extending through September, and include basil, cilantro, dill, fennel, marjoram, mint, oregano, parsley, sage, and tarragon.

Summer Favorites:

 

Hey, Baby, What's Your Sign?

When a baby is 9-months-old and waves bye-bye, they are using the sign that you’ve taught them. The baby has the motor skills to sign and communicate but not the verbal skills yet.
Using sign language with babies can greatly reduce the frustration that is felt by both the parents and the child.

There comes a time when your child wants something but they can’t verbalize what it is. They will usually point and whine. Then we play the guessing game.

Mom: “Would you like juice?”

Child: shake of the head, more point and whine.

Mom: “Would you like a snack?”

Child: stomp the foot, more point and whine.

Mom: “Ugh, I don’t know what you want. Would you like a cookie?”

Child: (Through body language) Oh? A cookie? Sure, why not!

Mom: Whew!

Child: (Learns that point and whine will get me either what I want or a cookie. I’ll need to do that more often.)

Starting at about 6 months of age, you can expose your child to signing. By about 9 months of age, they can communicate their needs.

Signing will not slow their speech; in fact, by showing them that communication goes both ways, they can learn to speak sooner. You’ll want to show them the sign and say the word with it, so they learn to associate the word with the sign.

Here are a few basic signs that are easy to teach, but very helpful:

The Cure for the Common Hospital - Join Us at the Swedish Issaquah Opening Event!

What if you could build a brand new hospital from scratch? How would you build it to be the most patient-friendly, forward-thinking facility of its kind?

Someday, there will be a hospital built to challenge our idea of what a hospital should be.

Someday, there will be a hospital focused on both healthier patients and a healthier planet.

And someday, there will be a hospital that is as much a place to gather as it is to heal.

That someday is now.

Join us on Saturday, July 9, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. to explore the cure for the common hospital. It’s an exciting time, and we’re looking forward to opening this innovative, patient-centric facility to serve the residents of Greater Issaquah/Sammamish and East King County.

Click here to read more about the open house event, find directions and parking or shuttle information, sign up to receive a free health screening at the event, or register for a free health class.

You can also:

Pharmacologic Treatment of Nystagmus in Multiple Sclerosis

At least half of all people with multiple sclerosis (MS) are expected to have nystagmus at some point during the course of their illness. Nystagmus results from demyelination that involves the brainstem or cerebellar eye movement pathways. While it may be asymptomatic, it often causes blurred vision or oscillopsia. The extent of the visual disturbance is directly related to the velocity of the slow phase of the nystagmus.

In MS patients with chronic nystagmus, the most common form is an acquired pendular nystagmus (APN), which is almost always accompanied by optic atrophy, and often by internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO).

Numerous treatment trials have demonstrated the efficacy of pharmacologic treatment of chronic symptomatic nystagmus. Treatment should be considered in individuals in whom blurred vision or oscillopsia is severe enough to warrant the potential risk of medication side effects. As a general rule, drugs used to treat nystagmus are titrated slowly upwards from a low dose to either efficacy or tolerance.

The two most effective medications for APN in MS are....

Which Swedish Edmonds Baby is Your Favorite?

Babies are born nearly everyday at Swedish Edmonds – in fact we had our 60,000th baby born just a few weeks ago. It was quite a milestone in our hospital’s 47-year history. So it’s always an exciting time at our Childbirth Center. Now we have two new reasons to celebrate. Our Childbirth Center is newly redesigned with new flooring, furniture and lighting, and we have a new tour at the hospital – the Have a Happy Birth Day tour. The tour helps women who are newly pregnant or who are considering becoming pregnant learn all about birthing options available at Swedish Edmonds.

With a new tour and a new look, we’ve invited four of our precious Swedish Edmonds patients and their parents to celebrate with us. You’ve probably seen their adorable photos on the Have a Happy Birth Day billboards along Highway 99 in Edmonds, Highway 527 in Mill Creek and along the Mukilteo Speedway. There’s nothing like a 14-foot baby to get your attention!

All of our newborns are favorites at Swedish Edmonds, but we’re wondering which one is your favorite? Which of the four baby billboard photos below makes you smile or maybe inspires you to Have a Happy Birth Day?

Swedish Participates in CorPath PRECISE Clinical Trial and Becomes First on the West Coast to Perform a Robotic-Assisted Coronary Angioplasty

 

Which car seat should I get?

Picking out a car seat is one of the most daunting chores when having a baby. I can tell you the least important aspect of which car seat to buy is the color. The baby doesn’t care what color, and in a crash it won’t matter.

When expectant parents find out I’m a car seat technician, the most common question is “Which seat should I buy?” I will not deny that car seat technicians all have their favorites. There are some car seats that are easier to install than others, but I am always apprehensive to name a specific seat. There is not one seat that fits every situation. (The examples I have in this post are just examples, not endorsements or recommendations.)

Ease-of-use is a huge selling point. It can mean that parents are more likely to use it properly.

For newborns, there are two ways to go. You can start a baby in either an infant-only/rear-facing only car seat with a carry handle, or you can start them out in a convertible that typically stays in the car and will eventually turn forward-facing.

The features to look for in a car seat for an infant (either type) are:

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