July 2014
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July 2014 posts

Swedish Launches Studies Examining Focused Ultrasound as a Potential Treatment for Parkinson’s disease, Brain Tumors

Swedish Neuroscience Institute leads national ultrasound technology research

 
News Release
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                                          
 

Contact: Clay Holtzman, Swedish, (206) 998-5028, clay.holtzman@swedish.org

SEATTLE — July 30, 2014 — The Swedish Neuroscience Institute (SNI) is expanding its study of focused ultrasound as a novel treatment for brain disorders with the opening of two clinical trials examining the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and brain tumors. The new trials add to the institute’s ongoing study of focused ultrasound for a treatment of essential tremor (ET).
 
“SNI is one of the few locations in the world where focused ultrasound is being studied at this level. These efforts exemplify SNI’s ongoing mission to deliver leading edge treatment for brain and spinal conditions,” said David Newell, M.D., Chief of Neurosciences at SNI. “We are honored to be a pioneer in this field and are eager to produce translational results.”
 
These trials come after SNI launched a study last year examining focused ultrasound’s potential as a treatment for essential tremor, a common neurological disorder resulting in involuntary shaking. The original study was designed to determine viability and safety of ultrasound treatment in improving the quality of life for those affected. Together, these three studies place SNI at the forefront of clinical care providers studying focused ultrasound as a treatment approach.

How to deal with gas and bloating

We all have occasional gas, usually from something we have eaten, but many people feel that they pass too much gas or burp too frequently. Intestinal gas can result in abdominal pain, bloating and embarrassment.
 
The amount of gas produced by the body depends upon your diet and other factors. Most people with symptoms of excessive gas do not produce more gas than the average person, but are more aware of normal amounts of gas.
 
Where does the gas come from?

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in Head and Neck Cancer

Cancer of the oropharynx (throat) has undergone a drastic and dramatic change over the last decade.  In the past, most throat cancers were linked with prolonged cigarette smoking and alcohol use.  Now, the occurrence of throat cancer is rising and 80-90% is likely caused by an infection with Human Papillomavirus (HPV).  Many high-profile personalities, including actor Michael Douglas, have recently revealed that they have experienced HPV-related throat cancer.

What causes HPV-related Oropharynx cancer?

Infection with the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is known to cause genital warts and lead to various genital cancers, but now it appears to also cause the majority of throat cancers.  The types of HPV that lead to throat cancer are generally sexually transmitted, though some researchers believe that even kissing may result in HPV transmission.   The time period from HPV exposure to the development of a throat cancer is often decades. Although the cancer may be slow-growing, it is important to have annual check-ups with your physician and dentist who can assess your oral health appropriately. 
 
How is HPV-related Oropharynx cancer treated?


HPV-related throat cancer can ...

How to prevent food poisoning

Many of us are aware of the recent nationwide recall of peaches and other fruit due to the potential of bacterial contamination.  Although thankfully, no illnesses have been reported so far, I’d like to take this opportunity to refresh our knowledge about ways to avoid food borne illness or food poisoning.

 
According to The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), food poisoning affects approximately 1 in 6 Americans every year. Often it results in relatively mild symptoms such as nausea, diarrhea and vomiting that resolve within a day or so. However, food poisoning can also lead to more dangerous and even deadly outcomes, which is why food safety is so important! 
 
So how should we protect our family from food borne illness?   It’s pretty easy!  Just remember 4 basic steps:  clean, separate, cook and chill!

Talking to kids about traumatic world events

From Hurricane Sandy, shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School, Boston Marathon bombing, the Oso mudslide and most recently the shooting at Seattle Pacific University, so often now we are given immediate access and awareness to traumatic and sudden events happening around the world and right in our own communities.  As parents we play an essential role in helping our children cope with stress and the emotions that come with a traumatic event.  Sometimes we think it would be better for them not to know about these things or that talking about will make it worse, but it’s important to respect their reactions and provide a place for them to talk about it. 

Why is it important to talk with my child? 

Talking to your child is an important first step in helping them understand and process any life event and especially a large scale traumatic event.  Your child may have already heard about the event through school, social media, friends or other sources.  Taking the initiative to talk with them allows you the opportunity to clarify the facts, answer questions and provides them a chance to share their own feelings. 

What should I tell my child?

Knowing ...

Treating tennis elbow with platelet rich plasma

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) is concentrated blood plasma containing a large amount of platelets. This concentrate, which is derived from your whole blood, is rich in growth factors that help heal injured tendons, ligaments, muscles, and even cartilage.  PRP is injected into the affected region to stimulate and enhance healing. Unlike cortisone injections, PRP helps heal the injured tissue and improve its function.  One of the most common areas of treatment with PRP is tennis elbow. 

Recently, a large study on PRP for tennis elbow was published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine.  They found success rates for patients with 24 weeks of follow-up were 83.9% in the PRP group compared with 68.3% in the control group. No significant complications occurred in either group. 
 
In the news, New York Yankees pitcher Masahiro Tanaka sustained a partially torn ulnar collateral ligament in his pitching elbow. He was ...

Swedish CEO Anthony Armada Named One of Becker’s ‘People to Know’ in Healthcare

Anthony Armada, FACHE, CEO of Swedish Health Services, was recently named one of ‘500+ People to know in Healthcare’ by Becker’s Hospital Review. The list says this about Armada:

Anthony Armada is CEO of Swedish Health Services in Seattle. Mr. Armada was named to lead the five-hospital system in October, prior to which he served as president of Advocate Lutheran General Hospital in Park Ridge, Ill.”

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