January 2014
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January 2014 posts

Troubles swallowing food or liquids – what does it mean?

Dysphagia refers to the sensation of food or liquid being delayed or hindered from the mouth to the stomach.  This abnormality is increasingly recognized as an important concern that requires attention and study.  There are many causes of impaired swallowing, which are categorized into two types, mechanical, a structural barrier to food bolus movement, and motility disorders, involving abnormal muscle movement.  There are also two major anatomical sites, oropharyngeal and esophageal. 
 
Oropharyngeal dysphagia is related to problems with the initiation of the swallows and clearing the food bolus from the mouth to the esophagus.  This usually occurs within a second of swallowing and you may feel that you cannot initiate a swallow or food hangs up in the neck region.  A test that is commonly used to evaluate this is a modified barium swallow or videofluoroscopic swallowing study.  This study provides critical information on inability or excessive delay in initiation of swallowing, unintentional inhalation of food, unintentional expulsion of food from the nose or mouth, and/or abnormal retention of food in the back of the throat after swallowing.  Most ...

January 25 essential tremor seminar

If you or someone you care about shakes a lot—it could be essential tremor (ET) or another movement disorder. Essential tremor is a disorder affecting approximately 10 million Americans. This progressive neurological condition can cause the hands, head, voice, legs or trunk of the body to shake and can cause significant disability. It is often confused with Parkinson’s disease or dystonia. Because of stereotypes and lack of awareness, many people with ET never seek medical care, though most would benefit from treatment.
 
In an upcoming event, Dr. Ryder Gwinn will explain the causes, diagnosis,  research and treatment options for essential tremor.
 
Date: Saturday, January 25
Time: Check-in 9:30am/Program 10am-Noon
Location: Bellevue Hilton, 300 112 Ave SE, Bellevue, WA
 
There is no charge for the event but please note, parking in the Bellevue Hilton lot is $5.

Registration is required - call 888-387-3667 or visit www.essentialtremor.org/seminars

 

 
 

Why do some people play their music so loud?

Have you heard someone ask this question?  Have you asked it yourself?  It is a question I hear frequently from persons in my office.  The answer is not simple nor is it the same for everyone.  There is one important factor, though, that remains poorly understood.

A short anatomy lesson

Our inner ear, or cochlea, has thousands of cellular components called hair cells.  These cells act as biological amplifiers when the sound arriving at our ear is soft.  That is, they pump up and down at the same frequency as the sound entering our ear making it more intense.  This allows us to hear very soft sounds.

These same cochlear cells which amplify soft sounds can also contract and dampen the loud sounds which enter our ear.  This prevents the ear from being over driven and this, in turn, prevents distortion.

So what happens if these cells are gradually damaged so that they no longer work properly?  The simple answer is ...

More Partnerships Between Doctors and Hospitals Strengthen Coordinated Care for Medicare Beneficiaries

123 New Accountable Care Organizations Join Program to Improve Care for Medicare beneficiaries


SEATTLE – The Providence and Swedish ACO of Washington has been selected as one of 123 new Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) in Medicare, providing approximately 1.5 million more Medicare beneficiaries with access to high-quality, coordinated care across the United States, Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced Dec. 23.

Doctors, hospitals and health care providers establish ACOs in order to work together to provide higher-quality coordinated care to their patients, while helping to slow health care cost growth. Since passage of the Affordable Care Act, more than 360 (ACOs) have been established, serving over 5.3 million Americans with Medicare. Beneficiaries seeing health care providers in ACOs always have the freedom to choose doctors inside or outside of the ACO. ACOs share with Medicare any savings generated from lowering the growth in health care costs when they meet standards for high quality care.

“Accountable Care Organizations are delivering higher quality care to Medicare beneficiaries and are using Medicare dollars more efficiently,” Secretary Sebelius said.  “This is a great example of the Affordable Care Act rewarding hospitals and doctors that work together to help our beneficiaries get the best possible care.”

Why I'm a cancer doctor

I was traveling last week.  After the stewardess pointed out the exits, the broad shouldered gentleman stuffed into the seat next to the seat I was stuffed into, decided to make some small talk. “What kind of work do you do?” 

“I am an oncologist,” I said, and prepared myself for what I knew was coming next.  There are only two responses to “I am an oncologist.”  The first is, “what’s that?”  (The word oncology is code.  In the 60s it was politically incorrect to say “cancer”.  Even today, patients and clinicians stumble around the word, preferring terms like malignancy, neoplasm, tumor, or just lump.  Cancer care was entering the dawn of an era where not everyone was going to die and was soon to become a new specialty, so the word “oncology” was coined to avoid saying the “C word.”  But when someone doesn’t know the code word you have to be direct.  “I am a cancer doctor.”)

If the second question isn’t asked first, it is asked next.  It isn’t really said like a question, it’s more like a statement with a question mark.  Sometimes the statement is one of wonderment, but as often as not it is pity.  “Why did you decide to be a cancer doctor?”

Cancer is a fascinating disease.  It is the closest thing, in this life, that we will get to immortality.  Take cancer cells, put them in a test tube and take care of them right and those cells can be grown forever.  Take our normal cells and care for them the same way and they will be dead in two weeks.  We do research on cells harvested from cancer patients 20 years ago.  Besides being mortal our normal cells respect the space of other cells ...

Seattle’s First Baby of 2014 is a Swedish Baby

Congratulations to Niamh O'Connell and Wyatt Powell, who are the proud parents of Seattle’s first baby born in 2014. Killian Powell was born at 12:51 a.m. on Jan. 1 at Swedish First Hill. KING 5 television sat down with the family and gave viewers a sense of what little Killian and his parents can expect over the coming years.

Resolve to give the gift of comfort and warmth all year long

The holiday season is the perfect time to give back to the ones we love, our community, and those who have yet to enter our lives. For many of us, small, simple acts of kindness are easiest to introduce in our efforts to give back, especially when we are busy getting back to work or school in the new year. Thankfully, giving back doesn’t mean you have to give up a huge amount of your time!

One unique way to make a huge impact in our community is by using your hands, heart, and brain, together—to knit! The Swedish Cancer Institute (SCI) has been lucky enough to have the support of community members near and far who have donated thousands of knitted hats for patients undergoing cancer treatment. These donations come at prime time during the holiday season but act as gifts all year long!

During chemotherapy, many patients experience hair loss. With the loss of hair, many patients experience low self-confidence, heightened sensitivity to fabric and weather conditions, and limited flexible income to purchase headwear.

With the support from our patients, caregivers and community, the SCI has been able to provide free knitted hats to patients undergoing treatment for over nine years. Knitting hats is fast, and provides both literal and figurative warmth directly to patients at a time when they may feel most vulnerable during their treatment. If you’re an experienced knitter, or someone who wishes to learn how to knit, or would love to knit for a cause, join a Knit for Life group at either the SCI First Hill or Issaquah campus.

This network of volunteers uses knitting as a healing experience to enhance the lives of cancer patients, their family members and caregivers during treatment and recovery. The group provides a supportive environment for beginners and experienced knitters. All knitting materials are provided ...

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