Seattle Times Article about King County Project Access Features Charity-Care Efforts of Swedish's Mo

Seattle Times Article about King County Project Access Features Charity-Care Efforts of Swedish's Mother Joseph Clinic, Specialists who Volunteer There

SEATTLE, Jan. 15, 2007 -- The Mother Joseph Clinic at Swedish Medical Center/Cherry Hill Campus is a clinic for uninsured and low-income patients who need specialty care. It's part of an ambitious and expanding plan -- King County Project Access -- that makes it easier for specialty doctors to give back to the community.

King County Project Access aims to fill the medical chasm that has left many patients with nowhere to turn for their nonurgent but serious conditions.

Begun as a pilot effort two years ago, Project Access enlists specialists by removing many issues that have dissuaded them from volunteering: unreliable patients, language barriers, and the need to coordinate logistics for patients needing hospital services as well. Last year the program arranged about 800 free patient visits in a dozen specialties such as neurology, podiatry and cardiology. Its leaders estimate that Project Access could set up as many as 12,000 patient visits a year when it is fully established.

Since the Mother Joseph Clinic -- and the Swedish-affiliated specialist physicians who volunteer there -- are partners with King County Project Access, they were featured in a Jan. 15 Seattle Times article.

Swedish-affiliated orthopedic hand surgeon -- John Miyano, M.D. -- who volunteers at the clinic twice a month and Mother Joseph Medical Director Rayburn Lewis, M.D., were both interviewed for the article.

To read the article on The Seattle Times' Web site, click here.

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For more information about Swedish's Mother Joseph Clinic, click here and here.

For more information about King County Project Access, click here.

 


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