February 2013
Blog

February 2013 posts

Tips for dealing with dust allergy

Although it’s hard to imagine, we are living and sleeping with thousands of little bugs called dust mites.

For many people, ignorance is bliss, but for those who are allergic, these bugs can cause lots of problems. Dust mite allergy symptoms include eye redness and discharge, itching, sneezing, congestion and trouble breathing. Dust mites are a problem all year long, but can be more obvious in the winter when people spend more time indoors.

Dust mites like to burrow into soft surfaces, like carpets, curtains, pillows, mattresses and stuffed animals. It is impossible to completely kill all dust mites, but here are six ways to minimize exposure:

Preventing progression of Barrett's esophagus to cancer without surgery

Many people wonder what the treatment for Barrett's Esophagus (BE) is. Treatment for BE without dysplasia consists primarily of controlling esophageal acid exposure, usually with once a day proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medications like omeprazole (Prilosec®). Occasionally, twice a day dosing or even anti-reflux surgery may be necessary to completely control acid reflux. Unfortunately, suppressing acid does not usually cause the Barrett’s tissue to regress or even prevent it from progressing to cancer.

If dysplasia is found on any biopsies, treatment recommendations change:

  • Low-grade dysplasia: Close surveillance with endoscopy every 6-12 months or ablation.
  • High-grade dysplasia: Endoscopic therapy to destroy Barrett’s tissue or surgery.
  • Early cancer: Endoscopic removal of focal cancer followed by tissue destruction or surgery

Experiments performed 20 years ago showed that in most people, once the Barrett’s tissue has been removed or destroyed, normal squamous tissue tends to regrow in the area as long as acid reflux is suppressed.

Endoscopic tissue destruction can be performed many ways:

Nurses: At the Core of the Patient Care Team

Nurses are at the core of the patient care team. Whether a patient is diagnosed with cancer, admitted to the Swedish Neuroscience Institute or delivering a healthy baby, they receive care from a team of highly-skilled and dedicated nurses.

Many of us take it for granted that our nurses will be skilled, competent and caring. But how do new nursing school graduates learn how to be effective caregivers?

Swedish’s senior nursing leadership created Swedish's innovative Registered Nurse (RN) Residency Program in 2010, after doing extensive research on nationwide best practices for effectively transitioning academically trained RNs with bachelor's degrees to a commitment to careers in the stressful and demanding environments that nurses face in critical care settings.

The goal of the program is to address at Swedish the serious problems posed by a looming national shortage of experienced and skilled hospital critical care nurses. An important strategy for accomplishing this goal lies in reducing the troublingly high percentage of newly hired RNs who drop out of the profession during the first year or two after they are hired.

The inaugural Destination Swedish luncheon event on Feb. 11 generated nearly $500,000 for the program, which has been carefully designed to promote a culture of peer support and shared learning between new RNs who go through an intensive 12- to 24-week residency program together.

The following is an interview with Susan Jones, clinical educator in the program.

What is a nurse residency and why it is important?

Susan: Nursing school...

Minor & James Medical OB/GYN Interviewed on KING 5 TV about Preparing for Motherhood

SEATTLE, Feb. 19, 2013 - As part of a week-long series on childbirth-related topics, KING 5 TV's (NBC) morning newscast featured a live, in-studio interview about preparing for motherhood with Minor & James Medical OB/GYN Robin Cole, M.D.

My practice philosophy

1. Benefit the patient, that is the most important thing
     a. That means optimizing the outcome
           i. preserving the highest quality of life
           ii. For as long as possible
           iii. Optimizing the quality of life when prolongation is no longer possible
           iv. Sometimes it means a good death.
2. There is no excuse for not using the most current information
     a. RSS feed
     b. Look it up for every patient, no matter how familiar it feels
3. Honesty
     a. With the patient
          i. Phrasing is important
              1. we all need hope
     b. With the family
     c. With myself
          i. Am I doing my best at all times?
4. The patient is not a vessel of the disease.
      a. Sometimes shrinking a cancer is not a good investment for the patient.
             i. The treatment can lower quality of life
             ii. Sometimes, the treatment can shorten life.
     b. Research can emphasize the impact on the disease to the exclusion of impact on the patient
5. It is at least as important to know what doesn’t work as what does.
     a. Sparing the patient side effects is sometimes the best thing the doctor can do.
6. All assumptions should be questioned.
     a. More intensive, ineffective treatment is not good care
     b. The most dramatic therapy has the same burden of proof as any other therapy
     c. Sometimes a clinical trial is the most appropriate path
           i. But evaluate all of the alternatives

Immune-boosting foods: what you need to know about antioxidants for your health

I felt compelled to write this post primarily because I am exhausted from witnessing those dramatic cold and flu commercials I see everywhere. We all know how to treat a cold or the flu: rest, fluids, and antioxidant rich foods. Yet many of us (I’m guilty, too) reach for Emergen-C thinking that’s all we need and give little (or no) thought to what ‘antioxidant rich’ foods may do to help. So for your health and mine, I’ve highlighted some of those antioxidant-rich foods that should be featured on our plates this season.

First – what are antioxidants?

Antioxidants are nutrients and enzymes that quench free radicals (unstable harmful molecules that are the result of oxidative damage), therefore protecting your cells from damage. Free radicals can do a number on your immune system, thus blunting your ability to respond to a cold. Major antioxidants include Carotenes (beta-carotene), Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium & Zinc.

Where can I get or find antioxidants?

Swedish Mill Creek to Host Free Seminar Feb. 21 on Treatment Options for Heavy Menstrual Bleeding

MILL CREEK, WASH., Feb. 19, 2013 – If heavy periods are interfering with your daily activities, you’re not alone. It is estimated that one in five women deal with this problem every month. The good news is that there is a wide range of treatment options that can reduce or eliminate those symptoms and get women back to their regular activities.

Results 8-14 of 33