December 2013
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December 2013 posts

Swedish Medical Center Foundation Receives $10.1 Million Gift from The Robert and Jean Reid Family Foundation

With its largest gift, the Campaign for Swedish surpasses $128 million

 

News Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE   

Contact: Clay Holtzman, Swedish, 206-386-2748, clay.holtzman@swedish.org

SEATTLE – Dec. 11, 2013 – The Swedish Medical Center Foundation announced today that it is receiving a gift of $10.1 million from the estate of Robert and Jean Reid that will support advanced cancer and cardiac care at Swedish. Funds from the gift will be distributed to the Swedish Foundation over many years through The Robert and Jean Reid Family Foundation.

The gift — the largest made during the $100 million Campaign for Swedish — will help to establish a core component of the Swedish Cancer Institute’s (SCI) Personalized Medicine Program: The Robert and Jean Reid Family Innovative Therapeutics & Research Unit. The Reid Family Innovative Therapeutics & Research Unit will aim to evolve cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment through advanced clinical research. For example, Swedish will test patient genes to better understand how a cancerous tumor might respond to a specific treatment. This is one step toward personalizing treatments and improving patients’ lives and outcomes.

“The new Reid Family Innovative Therapeutics & Research Unit will help position SCI as a national and international thought leader in personalized, molecular-based cancer prevention and therapy,” said Dr. Thomas Brown, executive director of the Swedish Cancer Institute.

PSBJ covers physician compensation shift

A recent article in the Puget Sound Business Journal covers shifts in Swedish's physician compensation model. Click here to read the story. 

Swedish Nurses Honored by March of Dimes

The Washington Chapter of the March of Dimes honored local nurses at the 11th Annual 2013 Nurse of the Year Awards on Thursday, Nov. 21 at the Meydenbauer Conference Center.

The Nurse of the Year Awards program recognizes exceptional nurses, creates awareness of professional excellence and promotes the future of the nursing profession, while helping advance the mission of the March of Dimes. Whether serving as a health care provider, educator, researcher, or chapter volunteer/advisor, these nurses have played a critical role in improving the health of Washington’s community.

One hundred and fifty nominations were submitted in Washington State. Twelve nurses received top honors with five award winners from Swedish Medical Center (SMC).

Radiosurgery treatment for brain metastases reduces risk of memory loss and improves survival

When a person has metastatic cancer, the brain is one of the organs that cancer cells can migrate to. If this happens, the condition is called brain metastases. The brain metastases will have the same cancer cell type as the primary cancer, such as lung or breast cancer.

If this occurs, radiation treatment is often used to control these areas of disease. Research is finding that utilizing stereotactic radiosurgery as the initial treatment for people with four or less brain metastases is associated with improved survival and reduced risk of memory loss compared to whole brain radiation. Stereotactic radiosurgery ....

Bisphosphonate medications and Osteonecrosis of the jaw

Bisphosphonate use has been increasing in recent years.  This is a class of medications that is used to solidify bone mass and prevent fractures.  They fight osteoporosis, but also prevent many cancers from spreading into skeletal bones (bone metastases).  Many patients with metastatic cancers (breast, prostate, renal cell, multiple myeloma, etc.) will require these medications to counteract the devastating consequences of bone metastases.

Bisphosphonates were described as early as the 19th century, and were approved by the FDA in the 1990s for human use.  Fosamax was the first FDA approved bisphosphonate in the USA.   The medications come in an oral (pill) form and an IV version.  Other commonly prescribed bisphosphonates include:

  1. Zometa  (Zolendronate)
  2. Actonel  (Risedronate)
  3. Boniva  (Ibandronate)
  4. Aredia  (Pamidronate)

An uncommon but significant potential side effect of bisphosphonates is the development of Bisphosphonate-associated Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (BONJ).  This is primarily associated with...

New Brain Stimulator Approved to Treat Epilepsy

On November 14th, 2013 the FDA gave its approval for an implanted brain stimulator to treat patients with medically refractory epilepsy. Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders affecting nearly 1 in 100 Americans. This device has been under investigation for 10 years at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute (SNI) Epilepsy Center.

As principal investigator for the trial, I led  a team including Dr. Michael Doherty, Dr. Lisa Caylor and Dr. Alan Haltiner, along with the research department at Swedish to investigate the safety and effectiveness of the device through pivotal trials. The results showed that the responsive neurostimulator system (RNS) made by NeuroPace was indeed effective in treating patients with drug resistant seizures.

Why is this so significant? This device represents the first new non-medication treatment for seizures proven to be effective since 1997, and gives new hope to patients whose lives have been put on hold due to seizures. ...

Swedish Brings the Holidays to the Hospital

The community is invited to enjoy holiday festivities with pediatric patients – a teddy bear clinic, caroling, holiday games and crafts – on Sunday, Dec. 8

 

SEATTLE — December 4, 2013 — Swedish and F5 Networks team up for the fourth year in a row to spread holiday cheer at this year’s Holidays at the Hospital. Swedish expects more than 400 guests, including pediatric patients, Swedish and F5 Networks staff, along with the broader community at Swedish/First Hill.

Taking place on Dec. 8, 2013, the event will include caroling, face painting, a teddy-bear clinic, holiday games, crafts and cookie decorating throughout the afternoon. Roger Levesque of the Seattle Sounders and Santa Claus will make a celebrity appearance.

“Every year we look forward to hosting Holidays at the Hospital,” said Dr. Guy Hudson, Swedish pediatric surgeon. “The hospital isn’t exactly the first place kids want to be during the holidays. This event helps to bring holiday cheer and some comforts of home to them.”

The event is open to the public. Those who wish to contribute but cannot attend can support the Holidays at the Hospital toy drive by donating toys, games and art supplies. Donated items will be given to Swedish patients, up to age 18, who are spending the holidays at the hospital.

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