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Stephanie Wilding, MS, CCLS

Stephanie Wilding, MS, CCLS

Certified Child Life Specialist

Stephanie Wilding is a Certified Child Life Specialist at Swedish and works with pediatric patients and their families at the First Hill Campus. Child Life Specialists provide developmentally appropriate education and preparation to pediatric patients and their families to promote coping throughout their hospitalization. She received her Bachelors Degree in Psychology, a Master of Science Degree in Marriage and Family Therapy and completed her Child Life Internship at Phoenix Children's Hospital. She has been as Swedish since 2009.

Blog Posts by Stephanie Wilding, MS, CCLS

Talking to kids about traumatic world events

From Hurricane Sandy, shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School, Boston Marathon bombing, the Oso mudslide and most recently the shooting at Seattle Pacific University, so often now we are given immediate access and awareness to traumatic and sudden events happening around the world and right in our own communities.  As parents we play an essential role in helping our children cope with stress and the emotions that come with a traumatic event.  Sometimes we think it would be better for them not to know about these things or that talking about will make it worse, but it’s important to respect their reactions and provide a place for them to talk about it. 

Why is it important to talk with my child? 

Talking to your child is an important first step in helping them understand and process any life event and especially a large scale traumatic event.  Your child may have already heard about the event through school, social media, friends or other sources.  Taking the initiative to talk with them allows you the opportunity to clarify the facts, answer questions and provides them a chance to share their own feelings. 

What should I tell my child?

Knowing ...

What to tell kids when a loved one is ill or in the hospital

When a loved one in the family is in the hospital or dealing with a chronic illness it can be hard to know what to say to the youngest family members.  It’s natural to want to “protect” them by not telling them or talking to them, but chances are the kids already know that something is going on.  An honest conversation can help to ease any misunderstanding they may have. 

Here are some important areas to cover when navigating a discussion about the illness or hospitalization of a loved one:

  • Honesty – Use words and descriptions that are appropriate for their age. If they are older they may ask specific details about the illness.  It’s good to call the diagnosis by name.  They may come back at a later date with other questions or even ask the same questions more than once. 
  • "Can I catch it?" – Children often have the fear that they can “catch” illnesses. They need to know, if in fact it isn’t a contagious disease, that they can not catch the illness from their loved one by being near them, hugging them and visiting with them.  This is particularly important if it is a brother or sister who is ill.
  • "Did I cause this?" – Many ....
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