AuthorDetail
Kate Floyd

Kate Floyd

Education Coordinator, Swedish MS Center

Kate Floyd served as the marketing and education specialist at the Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Center at Swedish Neuroscience Institute. Kate managed the MS Center’s online communication, educational programs and outreach.

Blog Posts by Kate Floyd

Inspiration from the artists of the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center Art Show

 

We are just a few weeks shy of the 4th Annual Multiple Sclerosis Art Show. We are excited to share the talented submissions we have received at the Seattle Center Armory on July 6-7 and share how art has helped them.

Today we congratulated artists who collectively submitted more than 100 entries for display in this year’s show. Each person has a unique connection to multiple sclerosis (MS), either as a person who has been diagnosed, a family member or friend.

The annual Art Show is part of the Swedish MS Center's commitment to helping people thrive apart from their disease. It was created and is put on each year by staff, patients and family members with the purpose of spreading awareness about the disease--and life beyond it.

4th Annual Multiple Sclerosis Art Show accepting entries

 

The Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center Art Show is accepting entries for its 4th annual exhibit. Art will be displayed July 6-7 at the Seattle Center Armory.
 

Who can enter?

The exhibit features art created by people who have been touched by multiple sclerosis (MS). Anyone with a connection to MS--whether diagnosed, family, caregiver, friend or colleague--is welcome and encouraged to enter. Read full guidelines.

What can I enter?

Seattle Channel highlights Swedish MS Center research

Thousands of people are diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) each year. The Pacific Northwest is home to more than 12,000 people living with the disease. Our area is also making great strides in research to find the cause and new treatments for MS.

The Seattle Channel featured a health special Thursday documenting the lives people affected by the disease and the progress area doctors and scientists are making. In the health special, the Seattle Channel highlights research at the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center that is advancing what we know and how docs treat the disease.

Watch the video for the full story, including an interview with Dr. James Bowen, a neurologist specializing in multiple sclerosis at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute, and a look inside the MS Center at Swedish:

 

Dr. Bowen tackles mysteries of MS in Scientific American MIND

The last 20 years have held significant gains for people living with multiple sclerosis (MS). Thanks to new studies and a full pipeline of those to come, our understanding of the disease and promises for future remedies grows rapidly.

Dr. James Bowen, Medical Director and neurologist at the MS Center at Swedish, wrote an article on this progress n Scientific American MIND. "Solving the Mystery of MS" unpacks the history of MS treatments, from breakthrough treatments to rethinking the disease origin, and offers a comprehensive view of what we know now as well as what lays ahead.

 

Employment Matters: New Workshop Series for Multiple Sclerosis

What do I tell my boss? Will I have to quit? How will I afford my future?

A multiple sclerosis diagnosis can come with a lot of uncertainty and questions about the future. But it does not have to be career-ending. Learning about your employment options and planning ahead can help you make informed decisions about your career.

Beginning May 8, 2013, the Multiple Sclerosis Center at Swedish Neuroscience Institute will offer free workshops to help people navigate their employment options. Employment Matters is a monthly series  designed to prepare people with the knowledge to confidently approach challenges, build a career plan and strengthen their employment options.

Shaheen Virani, CRC, leads the Employment Matters workshops. Shaheen is a rehabilitation counselor who specializes in helping people with MS make plans and decisions to support their individual employment needs--whether it is to continue working, make a career change or apply for disability.

Here are a few Employment Matters topics coming up this spring (or click here for the full 2013 schedule):

Multiple Sclerosis Center Celebrates First Anniversary

One year ago today, the first patients visited the brand new Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Center at Swedish Neuroscience Institute. The 11,700-square-foot facility was designed around the patient experience as part of the MS Center’s commitment to treating the whole person and addressing each patient’s individual emotional, psychological, social and physical needs in a supportive environment.

Since we opened our doors on April 9, 2012, we’ve hit a few new milestones:

  • More than 5,400 total patients, including 620 new faces, from around the world received care from our comprehensive treatment team in the last 12 months.

  • We welcomed three new providers: neurologist Peiqing Qian, M.D.; physical therapist Kim Kobata, PT; and neuro-psychiatrist Lina Fine, M.D., M.Phil.

  • We completed the Pigott Terrace. The 1,500-square-foot outdoor therapy terrace includes a one-of-a-kind system that enables patients to ...

Staying productive in the workplace with Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

"But you're so young!" is a reaction a many people with multiple sclerosis (MS) may hear when they talk about their diagnosis. There is a common misconception that MS is diagnosed older or appear much more disabled. However, most people are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 40, smack in the prime of her or his life and career.

MS symptoms may affect a person's ability to work and participate in an educational program more or less depending on the course of their disease. Many people wonder if they can keep working or they quit because of their MS limitations, causing financial stress.

There is a place in the workplace for people with MS and there are options to support you. Shaheen Virani is a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor at the MS Center at Swedish. A vocational counselor can help people living with MS navigate their employment options, whether it is to continue working, make a career change or apply for disability.

Vocational services at the MS Center are free and can often be coordinated with other appointments on the same day. A counselor can support people with MS in many ways, including:

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