AuthorDetail
Dan Dixon

Dan Dixon

Vice President, External Affairs

Dan directs public policy and legislative activity for Swedish, along with managing system wide corporate communications, marketing and business development. He has also undertaken efforts to develop innovative health care delivery models and in this role led efforts to develop the Ballard Medical Home, the Global to Local (G2L) initiative and Swedish’s unique Specialty Clinic for the underserved.

Blog Posts by Dan Dixon

Washington Health Benefit Exchange: Swedish Health Insurance Plans

Starting Oct. 1, 2013, Washington state residents were eligible to enroll in health-care coverage through the Washington Health Benefit Exchange (Exchange). The program gives individuals and families the ability to choose a health insurance plan that best fits their needs and their budget. The state has seen more than 55,000 enrollments during the first month.

Swedish is proudly supporting the Exchange and the implementation of the Affordable Care Act in our state. We are working to inform our patients about Exchange options and to direct them to resources to access these new benefits. We are also sharing these best practices with other caregivers.  

While we are collectively moving in the right direction, a transition of this scale is never seamless. That is why we strive to be a trusted resource to help our patients navigate these changes. Most recently, our patients have told us that there is confusion around which Exchange health insurance plans cover care at Swedish. As of Nov. 1, 2013, Swedish is a part of the following Exchange plans:

  • Community Health Plan of Washington (CHPW)
  • Coordinated Care
  • Molina

In addition to ....

Swedish's Perspective on the SCOTUS Ruling of the Affordable Care Act

As you have likely heard by now, the Supreme Court this morning issued a landmark decision that will allow implementation of the new health-care law to move forward.

Swedish aligned with the Washington State Hospital Association in support of the passage of the Affordable Care Act because it provides for better access to care for more individuals throughout the country. We recognize there are many supporting and opposing voices around this topic, and while not a perfect piece of legislation, the law will provide coverage for 30 million people who otherwise have no access to insurance by 2014.

While the Court’s decision brings additional clarity to national health reform, our commitment to improving health care regionally remains the same. For the past six years, Swedish has worked diligently to improve quality, reduce costs and increase access to health care, and we are fully committed to continuing down this path. We also remain committed to serving all those in need. Last year alone, Swedish provided $146 million in community-benefit activities.

Here is a summary of the ruling on the Affordable Care Act:

The Supreme Court ruled this morning on the constitutionality of President Obama’s health care law, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PL 111-148). The Court ruled 5-4 that the Affordable Care Act, including its individual mandate that virtually all Americans buy health insurance, is constitutional. While the Court did not find that the law was constitutional under the Commerce Clause, as argued by lawyers representing the federal government, five Justices agreed that the penalty that someone must pay if they refuse to buy insurance is a tax and that Congress has the authority to impose such a tax.

According to the SCOTUS Blog: “Because the individual mandate survived, the Court did not need to decide what other parts of the statute were constitutional, except for a provision that required states to comply with new eligibility requirements for Medicaid or risk losing their funding. On that question, the Court held that the provision is constitutional as long as states would only lose new funds if they didn't comply with the new requirements, rather than all of their funding.”

The court’s ruling gave President Obama a victory of sorts on a law whose most controversial provision — the individual mandate — is not set to take effect until 2014. Some popular provisions, such as family coverage for children up to age 26, have already taken effect. Congress gave the bill final approval in March 2010 on the strength of a Democratic majority in both the House and the Senate; Republicans gained control of the House in November 2010 in part by capitalizing on opposition to the mandate and vowing to try to repeal the law in its entirety.

Below is a synopsis of some of the key provisions that remain law after today’s court decision...

State budget crisis may hurt community clinics that serve the poor and uninsured

Swedish was proud to host several community clinics and their patients this week at a vigil on our First Hill campus. The goal was to urge lawmakers, who are currently in Olympia and facing difficult decisions about the state’s budget crisis, to protect funding for community health clinics dedicated to serving uninsured and low-income individuals.

Individuals gather in support of community health clinics

More than 200 individuals gathered at the vigil.

Local clinics – such as Country Doctor, Health Point, International Community Health Services, Sea Mar, Seattle Indian Health Board and Neighbor Care – play a vital role in the health care safety net of our community.

And they are some of Swedish’s most important partners. Together, we work to provide access to health care for those in need regardless of income or insurance status.

In this economy, however, that has not been easy. We have seen a surge in uninsured and low-income patient populations. Swedish provided $112 million in charity care, Medicaid subsidies and other community benefits in 2010, double the amount from the previous year.

Dr-Perez-CHC-event.jpg
Dr. Julian Perez speaks at the vigil.


Meeting the needs of underserved populations is something no single organization can do alone. It requires partnership and collaboration. 

Our work with the community health clinics is an excellent example of that. The community clinics play an important role by providing front-line primary care in local community. Swedish supports their work by making our hospitals, diagnostic services, specialists and ERs accessible to their patients and providers.

While we understand the budget realities facing our state, we encourage you to learn more about this critical issue and we urge our lawmakers to seek creative solutions to these difficult problems.

Results 1-3 of 3
  • 1