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Natalie Kozimor

Natalie Kozimor

Blog Posts by Natalie Kozimor

Celebrate the 20th Annual World Breastfeeding Week at Swedish/Issaquah

World Breastfeeding Week is an annual celebration held around the world to generate public awareness and support for breastfeeding families. And, in honor of this special week, Swedish/Issaquah Pediatrics and OB are hosting a community celebration – and you’re invited.

Join us on Wednesday, Aug. 1 from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. for a fun-filled day of activities. Raising a healthy, happy baby is one of the most rewarding things you’ll do. And, it doesn’t have to feel overwhelming.

We’re bringing together an impressive group of individuals and vendors to provide you and your family with information about health and education services. Our event will also feature:

  • Door Prizes
  • Story Telling
  • Teddy Bear Clinic
  • Massages
  • The Leche Lounge
  • Live Music
  • Yoga
  • “Ask-the-Doc” Booth

Event Location:
Swedish/Issaquah
751 N.E. Blakely Drive
Issaquah, WA 98029
2nd Floor Conference Center

The Facts (and Fiction) About Ear Infections

The most common bacterial illness in children accounting for millions of doctor visits each year is otitis media — a middle ear infection. Acute otitis media typically occurs during or after a cold, upper respiratory infection or bout with allergies when the Eustachian tube that connects the middle ear to the throat becomes swollen and traps fluid. The fluid can cultivate bacteria or viruses, causing an infection.

Is there any way to protect your child from this potentially painful illness? How do you know if treatment is needed? We spoke with Swedish Otolaryngologist Linnea Peterson, M.D. who helped us separate fact from fiction regarding middle ear infections.

There is no way to avoid repeated ear infections; they’re just a part of childhood.

FICTION.

  • “Though it’s true that otitis media is one of the most common childhood ailments, parents can take steps to reduce their child’s risk,” says Dr. Peterson. “Consider....

How to avoid and care for cuts

It happens so quickly. You’re innocently chopping up vegetables for dinner when you find yourself on the receiving end of a cut — ouch! “Cuts are very common,” says Steven Rittenberg, M.D., who specializes in Internal Medicine at the Swedish Issaquah Primary Care Clinic. “However, there are some practical ways to prevent them, and some specific steps for treating them that can save you a trip to the doctor.”

Avoiding The “Ouch!”

Preventing cuts in the home is largely common sense, but life gets busy and we get careless, so here are a few reminders:

  • Keep knives sharp. Although this may sound counter-intuitive, a sharp knife slides more easily through an item avoiding a slip that may cut something you didn’t intend to cut, like your finger.
  • Pay attention. Resist the temptation to become distracted while using a knife.
  • Cut away from, not toward, yourself.
  • Don’t hold food that you are cutting; use a cutting board.
  • Don’t leave knives in dangerous places — loose in a drawer, in the sink, on the counter or facing up in the dishwasher — especially if you have children.
  • When handing someone a knife or sharp scissors, hold the flat part of the knife blade or closed blades of the scissors so they can grasp the handle.
  • Don’t pick up broken glass; sweep or vacuum it up thoroughly.

Treating It Right

When a cut does occur, the proper treatment will help to avoid infection or other complications:

Sleep Deprived in Seattle (And Everywhere Else)

There are many things we do less of now than in the past, and sleeping is one of them. In fact, studies show that people sleep an average of 20-percent less today than they did a century ago. Then, nine hours of sleep a night was typical; today it is closer to seven and a half hours spent in bed, with considerably less spent actually sleeping. And it’s not just adults that are sleeping less. The National Sleep Foundation’s annual survey in 2004 found that children were also getting less sleep than they needed, including infants.

“A few reasons we are sleeping less include the invention of electric light, jobs becoming more urban in nature, and an increase in technology in the home,” explains Darius Zoroufy, M.D., medical director of the Lake Sammamish Sleep Center.

Technology is one of the most glaring reasons behind American’s lack of sleep. “A 2009 study reported that TV is the number one factor keeping adults awake,” says Dr. Zoroufy. Computers, iPods, and cell phones are similar culprits.

“Not only are these things taking up our time, but they are stimulating us mentally, making it difficult for us to shift gears and fall asleep.”

Swedish Pediatric Sleep Specialist, Preetam Bandla, M.D., agrees. “Light from screen media can activate the light-sensitive circadian cells in our brains that regulate when we are maximally alert and maximally sleepy,” he explains, “So our TVs and computer screens can keep us from wanting to sleep.”

Technology is not solely to blame for our lack of sleep, however. “The majority of sleep problems result from self imposed and externally imposed factors,” says Dr. Zoroufy. “There are simply too many opportunities and pressures to stay awake.”

The demands of work, school, family and social activities are causing people to become overscheduled and the first thing people give up is sleep. “The idea that we can sleep less and still function well is a misperception,” says Dr. Bandla.

So how much sleep do we need and what can we do to obtain it?

Valentine's Open House at Swedish/Issaquah

Join us for a night out at Swedish!

What do a surgical robot and the Sammamish Symphony String Quartet have in common? You can see both at Swedish/Issaquah on Wednesday, Feb. 8 at 6 p.m.
 

Bring your valentine to this fun night out at Swedish — the Sammamish Symphony String Quartet will be holding a 90-minute performance starting at 6 p.m. Swedish is excited to host the quartet, so bring your family, friends and neighbors for this free community concert. It promises to be a fun, relaxed evening. While listening to the quartet’s beautiful music, you can also browse and shop our boutiques. The Shops at Swedish will remain open until 8 p.m. — find that special gift for your valentine, just in time for Valentine’s Day! Plus, complimentary chair massages will be offered in the Be Well shop — come take advantage of the mini massages.   
 
In addition, Swedish’s new robotic surgical system will be out on display; you can see the high-tech equipment used for knee surgeries up close! (Can't come, but interested in how the robots are used in knee surgeries? Check out these highlights from a live knee surgery.)
 
Café 1910 — Swedish/Issaquah’s café — will be open until 8 p.m. so stop by to meet our chefs and see what delicious food they have to offer. As an added treat during the event, Starbucks will offer a free tall drip of their featured Valentine’s Coffee — Verona.

Holiday Open House at The Shops at Swedish

You’ll Have a Jolly Good Time

Need an excuse to stop by the new Swedish/Issaquah hospital? More fun than you’ve ever had in a hospital is coming up on Thursday, Dec. 8. Stop by anytime between 9 a.m. and 8 p.m. for a holiday open house at The Shops at Swedish/Issaquah. It’s just one way we hope to spread some holiday cheer to the community this winter.

Bring the whole family for some fun. The event will feature:

  • A giant 7-foot gingerbread house that kids can help decorate
  • Free cookie decorating in Café 1910
  • 20%-off merchandise at The Shops at Swedish: Lily and Pearl, Comfort & Joy, Be Well and Perfect Fit boutiques – some exclusions apply
  • Free Starbucks Christmas Blend brewed coffee
  • Free apple cider and hot cocoa in Café 1910
  • Storytelling for the kids from 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. with Jen Nielsen (www.barefootenrichment.com)

  • Coloring contest for kids – the first 250 submissions will receive a free 12-inch Swedish Build-a-Bear teddy bear

Kids will have a blast decorating the giant gingerbread house with our Café chefs! Also, come find that perfect package for a family member, friend or loved one. And, browse our festive holiday decorations and home accessories.

In addition, Café 1910 will remain open for dinner until 8 p.m. 

Happy Holidays from Swedish/Issaquah! We Ho-Ho-Hope to see you on Dec. 8!

Find your Perfect Fit

In light of October being Breast Cancer Awareness Month, The Shops at Swedish/Issaquah are hosting a unique, complimentary event for women on Tuesday, Oct. 25 from 6-9 p.m.

Are you one of the eight out of 10 women wearing the wrong size bra? Many women don’t realize that they should have a bra fit every year to ensure their size has not changed. Finding the right size bra can be very challenging and that’s why the experts as Perfect Fit are here to help. The right bra can change the way you look in your clothes and make you feel more confident.

With October being Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the next weeks are a reminder to take time and care for your breast health. Please join us for our Perfect Fit event on Oct. 25 from 6-8 p.m. It’s a great opportunity to get fit and meet with our breast-health staff. The event will also feature appetizers by Tutta Bella, styling and seated chair massage by Gene Juarez, and a skin-care experience by Clarisonic. For more information, visit www.theshopsatswedish.org or call our Wellness Navigator at 425-313-7092.

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