August 2014
Blog

August 2014 posts

Considering Breast Augmentation?

Today’s blog post will cover some of the basic questions that many women I meet have about their breast augmentation operation. 

Pain Rules the Roost

It is clear that family members of patients suffering from chronic pain are hesitant to engage in strategies that will be of benefit to my patient. Why?

KING 5 HealthLink Profiles Focused Ultrasound Research at Swedish

KING 5 TV’s HealthLink program recently aired a segment on a clinical trial being conducted at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute at its Cherry Hill hospital. The study is examining the use of a novel, noninvasive approach to treating brain disorders using focused ultrasound. The concept is appealing to clinicians, as it could provide patients with a less invasive treatment option.

The KING 5 story examines the technology’s application for the treatment of essential tremor, one of the most common movement disorders. Swedish Neuroscience Institute is also studying focused ultrasound for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and brain tumors.

Watch the KING 5 HealthLink story here.

Preparing your teen for college and taking care of their health

College is a huge and exciting step in an adolescent’s development. Being prepared can help your teen stay healthy and know where to go when they’re not. Whether your child is staying close to home, or going across the country for school, here are a few tips to add to your college checklist:

Schedule a visit with your primary care physician. (See a list of local Swedish physicians who can see your teen here.)

  • Physicians can make sure your teen is up to date on immunizations that many colleges require. Teens commonly need influenza, Tdap, HPV, and meningococcal vaccines.

  • Ensure that your child has prescriptions (with refills) for all medications they routinely use. Even “as needed” medicines may become needed in college. These medicines should be kept in a locked box in your teen’s room, as many medications can be stolen or used illicitly.

  • Your teen should ...

Multiple Sclerosis Center August Pet of the Month

Meet Reggie - this two year old English Springer Spaniel loves visiting retirement homes and sporting hats and bow ties. Reggie may be the most dapper canine around as he enjoys showing off his attire and meeting new people. Found as a stray in Oregon, Reggie was rescued and placed in a shelter for ten days. Matted, disheveled, and smelly, Reggie waited but no one came to claim him. Soon after, English Springer Rescue America (ESRA) was called and he was adopted by his (now) best friend, Jackie Harrison. Jackie has trained Reggie to be her service dog while making him the best dressed dog in town. Reggie was Jackie's 14th foster dog through English Springer Rescue America.
 
Reggie in his patriotic attire at last year's 4th of July parade on Bainbridge IslandFor his training, Reggie and Jackie participated in a program through Summit Assistance Dogs in Anacortes, Washington. This non-profit organization rescues ....

Per Oral Endoscopic Myotomy (POEM) for achalasia

P.O.E.M. has come to Seattle at Swedish Medical Center.  No, not the kind that rhymes but one that is elegant in its own way.  Per Oral Endoscopic Myotomy or POEM is relatively new procedure used in the treatment of achalasia, which is a disorder of the esophagus due to degeneration of the nerve network within the walls of the esophagus.  The diseases leaves patients with little propulsive power to push food toward and into the stomach as well as causing the “valve” at the top of the stomach to remain closed.  This makes it difficult for patients to eat or drink.   Patients may need to drink a lot of fluid to get food to pass into the stomach whereas others may feel pain or discomfort after eating and still others may have undigested food come up many hours after eating or when lying down.
 
The treatment for achalasia is ...

Dealing with the Summer Heat and Multiple Sclerosis

Seattle's summer is not over yet and temperatures have been on the rise. Many individuals with Multiple Sclerosis experience a worsening of symptoms when the weather is hot or humid. The heat can temporarily induce symptoms; however, it does not cause more disease activity. Should one become overheated, simple steps can be taken to lower your body temperature. The following can assist in easing the effects of heat: 
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