April 2014
Blog

April 2014 posts

How to prepare your child for a stay at the hospital

We all know that Swedish provides top-notch pediatric services for the emergent needs of children and their families.  You may be surprised to find out that many children come to Swedish for a planned inpatient stay as well.  There can be various reasons why a child and their family might be anticipating a hospital stay.  Some examples may include having a surgical procedure that requires them to be monitored for a set period of time afterward, neurological video monitoring, or medical preparations for a procedure the following day.

Regardless of what service your child will be receiving at the hospital, there are ways in which you can better prepare them and yourself for what to expect during your stay.

At Swedish, Child Life Specialists help children and families cope with the hospital process.  Child Life Specialists are available to help educate and prepare children and families prior to surgery and/or an inpatient stay.  Some tips on how to prepare your child for an inpatient stay include .....

The Swedish Cancer Institute Launches Personalized Medicine Program

Richard Sherman, Swedish donors support new program that combines genomic medicine, supportive care


News Release
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                           
 

Contacts: Clay Holtzman, Swedish, 206-386-2748, clay.holtzman@swedish.org


SEATTLE — April 28, 2014 — The Swedish Cancer Institute (SCI) today announced its new Personalized Medicine Program that combines advanced medical treatments based on the unique, molecular signature of a patient’s cancer with supportive care that is designed to serve each individual’s physical and emotional health.
 
“Patients diagnosed with cancer often find themselves having to choose between advanced treatment programs typically associated with academic or research centers, and the patient-centered care they expect from their community hospital,” said SCI Executive Director Thomas Brown, M.D. “The Swedish Cancer Institute has a long history of extraordinary care, and with the addition of genomic medicine, we are continuing our legacy of giving patients the best of both worlds, now through our Personalized Medicine Program.”
 
Each patient is unique at the cellular level, so understanding the molecular fingerprint of an individual’s cancer helps guide treatment decisions. Combined with the comprehensive social services available to address the complex needs of patients and their families, SCI is striving to provide the most comprehensive, best-practice approach to treating cancer.
 

To kick-off the Personalized Medicine Program, SCI is launching a public awareness campaign that includes informative content on SwedishCancerInstitute.org as well as television spots, the first of which features Seattle Seahawks All-Pro Cornerback Richard Sherman. The video is available for viewing here.

 
“When I was asked to support the Swedish Cancer Institute’s Personalized Medicine Program, I realized I had a new opportunity to continue my passion for supporting the Seattle community,” said Sherman, who was recently named one of the 2014’s 100 Most Influential People in the World by TIME. “I’m honored to be a part of the innovative work the Swedish Cancer Institute is doing on behalf of patients and families across our region.”
 

Connect With the Moment - Active Meditation

Chronic pain is associated with anxiety and frustration. Consquently, your mind will continue to be filled with racing thoughts regardless of your attempts to slow them down. Shifting off of these pathways with simple mindfulness tools is an effective and necessary strategy.

Managing pain during labor

One of the most common concerns women have during their pregnancy is how to manage pain during labor and delivery.  Labor pain may be more or less intense than you expected, or may hurt in a different way. It is hard to predict how any labor will go or how anyone will respond to pain.

Labor pain is due to contractions of the muscles of the uterus and by pressure on the cervix. This can feel like strong cramping in the abdomen, groin, and back. Some women experience pain in their sides or thighs as well. Women can also feel pressure on the bladder and bowels by the baby's head and the stretching of the birth canal and vagina. Some find the hardest part is not the contraction itself, but the fact that the contractions keep coming.  

One of the best ways to alleviate fears for women is to learn about the available strategies for coping with pain. There are both medical and non-medical tools that may be a good match for you.

While you are deciding, think about what appeals to you most. Ask your health care provider these questions:

Naren Balasubramaniam New Swedish Chief Human Resources Officer

Swedish Health Services is proud to announce that Naren Balasubramaniam will serve as its new Chief Human Resources Officer. In his role with Swedish, Naren will have accountability for the Swedish HR function and will oversee the Swedish HR team and will also lead the change management and people engagement strategies at Swedish facilities. His first day was April 21.

Talking to kids about cancer

What do I tell my kids?” 

This is often the first question I’m asked by a parent with a new cancer diagnosis.  One of the most important things for parents to remember is that they know their children better than anyone else and they love them more than anyone…they can trust themselves to do this well.
 
Beyond that general reassurance, however, there are some practical tips for talking with children about a cancer diagnosis. 
 
Prepare for the conversation 
 
Think about your goals for the conversation.  What does your child need to know?  How you can help your child understand what’s going on?  How do you want your child to feel after the talk?  Who should tell your child you have cancer and can the person talking to your child stay relatively calm?
 
When and where should I have this conversation?  You don’t have to wait until you have all the answers.  Be prepared to ...

Special team of volunteers at Swedish MS Center

 
On Thursday, April 10, 2014, Swedish hosted a Volunteer Appreciation Celebration dinner and awards ceremony at the Seattle Tennis Club.  The event was to acknowledge and give thanks to all the volunteers who generously donate their time, and energy, to making Swedish a people friendly place.  The event was attended by more than 220 Swedish volunteers.
 
Our very own Swedish MS Center registered nurse Kim Lozano, and Certified Pet Therapy Volunteer Kathy Knox, and her Certified Therapy Dog Ocho (yellow Labrador retriever) were honored as Swedish’s “Featured Volunteer Program: The Leo Project.”  Kim created The Leo Project, better known as the Leo Pet Therapy Program to enhance the services we offer our MS Center patients and their families.  The name “Leo” was selected to pay tribute to Kim’s beloved dog Leo who passed away at the age of 13. 
 
Kathy Knox and therapy dog Ocho deliver comfort and care to all people who pass through our MS Center’s walls.  Ocho ...

Results 1-7 of 29