Swedish's Annual Auction Raises Record-Setting $6.2 million for New Women's Cancer Center, Charity-C

Swedish's Annual Auction Raises Record-Setting $6.2 million for New Women's Cancer Center, Charity-Care Program

SEATTLE, April 24, 2009 – Almost 800 people attended Swedish Medical Center's annual gala dinner auction, Celebrate Swedish, the evening of April 18 at the Sheraton Seattle Hotel and helped raise a record-setting $6.2 million – $5.4 million of which will be used to help the non-profit health system build a new Women's Cancer Center.

In support of Swedish's mission to improve the health and well-being of each person it serves – regardless of their ability to pay – $800,000 of the proceeds raised at this year's event will benefit charity-care services and other programs that help Swedish respond to community needs. In 2008, Swedish provided nearly $21 million in charity-care services.

Funds Raised for New Women's Cancer Center

Top among the many generous ‘Fund-a-Need' donations made that night was the wonderful gift of $2 million toward the Women's Cancer Center from members of the True family – Patty True, her son Doug True and his wife, Janet (along with their daughter, Effie, and son, Dustin); Patty's son Bill True and his wife, Ruth (along with their daughters Kimberly and Sophie and son, Peter). Slated to open in late 2010 on the Swedish/First Hill Campus, the $10 million facility – to be named The True Family Women's Cancer Center – will be the largest, most comprehensive of its kind in the Pacific Northwest.

Two $1 million gifts were also made that evening toward The True Family Women's Cancer Center. They included an anonymous $1 million donation from a corporate supporter of Swedish, and a $1 million advance grant from The Norcliffe Foundation (www.thenorcliffefoundation.com). Local community leaders Chap and Eve Alvord donated $600,000 to the Center.

"Considering Celebrate Swedish raised $4.3 million in 2008 when the world was not yet in the midst of an economic crisis, we feel really thankful for all our donors," said Swedish CEO Rod Hochman, M.D. "Thanks to these very generous gifts, The True Family Women's Cancer Center will soon be a single place women can go to access all the care specialists, tools, treatments and resources they need, rather than having to make appointments at several different locations. It will be a center that's warm and inviting where the experience will be as seamless and stress free as possible."

Once completed, a patient at the new 24,000-square-foot center will have access to clinics for breast surgery, treatment planning, second opinions, diagnostic imaging, ovarian cancer screening, gynecological oncology, research and clinical trials, high-risk evaluation, psychological services – as well as integrated offerings including naturopathy, physical exercise, nutrition, massage, meditation, wigs, art, music, knitting and more.

Honorary chairs for this year's 24th-annual fund-raising event were Eve Alvord, Barbara Buchman, Dorothy Fluke, Karen Lytle and Janet True. The auctioneers were Dick and Sharon Friel and David Silverman. In light of the Friel's long-time support of Celebrate Swedish, they were recognized that evening by event chairs and honored in a video that was shown documenting their many years of philanthropic support to the Seattle community.

Celebrate Swedish 2010 is slated for Saturday, May 8 at the Sheraton Seattle Hotel. For more information about that event, including sponsorship and volunteer opportunities, call the Swedish Foundation at 206-386-2738.

About Swedish

Swedish is the largest, most comprehensive nonprofit health provider in the Greater Seattle area. It is comprised of three hospital campuses – First Hill, Cherry Hill and Ballard – a freestanding emergency department and specialty center in Issaquah, Swedish Visiting Nurse Services, and the Swedish Physician Division – a network of about 40 primary-care and specialty clinics. In addition to general medical and surgical care, Swedish is known as a regional referral center, providing specialized treatment in areas such as cardiovascular care, cancer care, neuroscience, orthopedics, high-risk obstetrics, pediatrics, organ transplantation and clinical research. For more information, visit www.swedish.org

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Media Coverage

  • To read a related article published in the April 24 issue of the Puget Sound Business Journal and posted on their Web site, click here.
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