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What you need to know about Enterovirus D68

Uma Pisharody, MD, FAAP

Uma Pisharody, MD, FAAP
Pediatric Gastroenterologist

Recently, there has been a lot of discussion in the media about a severe type of respiratory illness affecting many children, mainly in the Midwest.  (As of today, we have no confirmed cases in Washington. Although there are some patients in local area hospitals suspected to be infected, their test results are still being processed and nothing has been verified so far.)  The respiratory illness, caused by an infection with Enterovirus D68, is scary to parents, because it’s hard to differentiate whether their child is ill from this particular virus or just has one of the many other viruses that cause cold- and flu-like symptoms around this time of year.
 
Sometimes media reports leave families with more questions than answers, which is why Dr. Dianne Glover, one of Swedish’s pediatric infectious disease specialists, wanted to share this information with you:

  • Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is an unusual form of an otherwise common group of viruses referred to as Enteroviruses.  These are hardy viruses that usually spread by the respiratory route, but can also spread by fecal-oral route.  It is even possible to become infected by touching a surface contaminated with these viruses.

  • EV-D68 causes a respiratory illness which can quickly progress from a child behaving like they have a simple runny nose and mild cough to then having serious difficulty breathing.  Children ....

What is ALS and why did it inspire ice bucket challenges at Swedish?

Michelle Scheff

Michelle Scheff
Speech Pathologist

Employees of Swedish Cherry Hill Outpatient Rehabilitation and Neurology Departments took the plunge and participated in the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge to raise awareness of ALS and funding for ALS research.  (Click here to see their video on Facebook.)




Before the ALS clinic team takes the ice bucket challenge
 
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), most commonly referred to as “Lou Gehrig’s Disease”, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease which affects the motor neurons responsible for voluntary movements and muscle power. As the disease progresses, individuals living with ALS may lose their ability to move and control the muscles of their extremities, torso, head and mouth which can make completion of basic activities such as walking, eating, talking and even breathing very difficult.

Unfortunately, the disease has no cure and only one medication has been approved for the treatment of ALS. Research is making strides towards understanding the underlying physiology and genetic makeup of the disease. Because of  ...

Swedish Sponsors & Walks in Seattle AIDS Walk

Brian Aylward, BS, CHES

Brian Aylward, BS, CHES
Health Navigator

Join Swedish and Minor & James Medical at the Seattle AIDS Walk, benefiting Lifelong, on Saturday, September 27, 2014.
 
The 2014 Seattle AIDS Walk takes place at Volunteer Park in Capitol Hill to help raise awareness of HIV prevention and treatment, along with supportive care programs available at Lifelong and in our communities.
 
Lifelong’s mission is to empower people living with or at risk of HIV/AIDS and/or other chronic conditions to lead healthier lives. Lifelong does this by offering a wide array of supportive services available throughout the King County area such as:

  • Prevention, education, and outreach

  • Chicken Soup Brigade (nutrition services)

  • Emergency, transitional, and permanent housing assistance

  • Assistance with obtaining medical insurance

  • Case management services

  • Recovery support services

Lifelong needs your support to bring as many supporters together as possible. Please consider joining Team Swedish & Minor and James Medical to spend a morning with your friends, colleagues, and community members!
 

Back To School – Patient Education Classes

Jolyn Hull

Jolyn Hull
Health Education Specialist, Swedish Cancer Institute

For many people, September signifies the beginning of a new school year. The leaves start to change and the familiar excitement of a new school year and the expectation of gaining new knowledge grows. The Swedish Cancer Institute would like to offer you the opportunity to “go back to school” this fall by attending our Patient Education Classes.

Our wide variety of classes include learning to cook with cancer-fighting food, tobacco cessation, palliative care, gentle yoga and more.  Classes are taught by content experts in each field and are a great way to learn more information about the specific services that are available. They are designed to be interactive, informational, and inclusive. These programs are offered to assist you, your family, friends and caregivers in making treatment decisions, managing your symptoms, and accessing complementary programs to help your mind, body and spirit to heal.

Classes are offered at the First Hill, Cherry Hill, Issaquah, and Edmonds campuses. To register for a class, call 206-386-2502 or visit www.swedish.org/classes.

Bilateral Mastectomies: a patient’s personal decision

Claire L. Buchanan, MD, FACS

Claire L. Buchanan, MD, FACS
Breast Cancer Surgeon

Last week the Seattle Times reported that women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer in one breast are choosing to have bilateral mastectomies to reduce their chances of getting cancer again, but recent research shows that that there is no survival benefit, even in younger women. Researchers at Stanford and the Cancer Prevention Institute of California evaluated the outcomes of over 190,000 women from the California Cancer registry who were diagnosed with breast cancer in one breast between 1998 and 2011. The rate of bilateral mastectomies rose from 2% to 12.3% over the study period, yet there was no survival benefit to bilateral mastectomies versus lumpectomy and radiation.

To those of us who work in the field, this data comes as no surprise; the trend of bilateral mastectomies is a known phenomenon. More than 10 years ago, I remember the chatter among surgeons at national meetings asking if others noticed that more and more, younger women were coming in asking for bilateral mastectomies. Back in 2007, Dr. Todd Tuttle authored a study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology that found that the rate of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy was on the rise, from just under 2% in 1998 to 5% in 2003. This week’s study only validates that this upward trend shows no sign of leveling off.

Why do patients choose bilateral mastectomies?

Many women ....

Multiple Sclerosis and the Winter Blues

Michelle T. Toshima
Many people with Multiple Sclerosis look forward to the cooler temperatures and reduced humidity that comes with fall and winter. Symptoms can be worse in the warm summer months so relief comes to many with the lower temperatures. With fall and winter right around the corner, it’s important to be aware of and prepare for the Winter Blues. 
 
The Winter Blues is fairly common in northern latitudes where the days become shorter and there is reduced sunlight.  The Winter Blues is often characterized by feeling irritable or gloomy, having less energy, sleeping more but not feeling more rested, and eating more, often with cravings for carbohydrates.  So what can one do to prevent the Winter Blues?

Red Doors at Swedish Cancer Institute

Kylie Davidson, MPH CHES

Kylie Davidson, MPH CHES
Supervisor, Health Education, Swedish Cancer Institute

During the next couple of weeks, you will find various doors and walls at the Swedish Cancer Institute decorated in a beautiful red wrapping paper. This is a symbol of Swedish’ support for Gilda’s Club and their Red Door campaign.
 

The Red Door campaign was established to ...
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